Mister Freedom® DOCKYARD Jacket, indigo linen-cotton HBT & 10 Oz. “Snow” denim edition, mfsc SS2020 “Waterfront Surplus”. Made in Japan.

 

DOCKYARD Jacket, model A: 7.7 Oz. indigo linen-cotton HBT.

DOCKYARD Jacket, model B: 10 Oz. “Snow” denim.

Raw SS2020 DOCKYARD jacket and worn SS2015 Tonkinoise Shirt.

Mister Freedom® DOCKYARD Jacket, indigo linen-cotton HBT & 10 Oz. “Snow” denim edition.
mfsc SS2020 “WATERFRONT SURPLUS”, SURPLUS catalog.
Made in Japan.

We took a stroll down memory lane and rigged-up a small capsule collection for Spring 2020, with references harking back to our earliest Mister Freedom® x Sugar Cane Co fictional scenario, the 2006 “MFSC Naval Clothing Tailor”. This concise “Waterfront Surplus” nautical grouping is inspired by 1930’s US Navy and French Marine Nationale utility uniforms, local-made and custom-tailored dungarees, with the usual liberties we like to take with History. This straight-forward and classic set is made of the DOCKYARD Jacket, LONGSHOREMAN Shirt, and SWABBIES Dungarees.

First to hit port is the DOCKYARD Jacket.
What could look like yet-another spin on a 1940’s regulation USN denim shawl collar seaman jacket, a profusely-replicated pattern in Heritage Fashion, is actually inspired by a rare French 1930s “Chantier naval” (shipyard) jacket. Our good friend and vintage collector/hunter Jérome Le Zouave, aka le “J”, gets all the credit for unearthing a batch of these gems last year, in a wild goose chase only he knows the secret of. One of these babies made its way to Sunny California and is now part of MF® archives.
As an unusual piece of militaria, the model’s history is not 100% clear to me, but these jackets were apparently a 1930s civilian contract to outfit French Navy shipyard workers. A well-worn lot of survivors ended-up as Government surplus in a French warehouse, and several specimen resurfaced last year. Jérome mentioned he could tell me more… but he’d have to kill me right after.

If the vintage model was stunning, the fit was as expected quite awful, so the pattern underwent a full rebuild. Our version is not a verbatim replica, but does keep the original’s main features and overall nautical vibe, with its shawl collar, two hip patch pockets, and specific cuffs. We spiced things up a bit by adding a removable chinstrap to the collar, and two inside chest pockets. We kept the rear panel two inconspicuous cinching darts, initially intended to be unsewn by the wearer for extra width if needed, in a typical display of utilitarian clothing design where function, practicality, and longevity prevail. It could be pointed-out that this is why the H&M label is hardly notorious its workwear.

We are releasing our DOCKYARD Jacket in two distinct fabrics, both a departure from the original garment, as that would have been too easy. The first option is a dark indigo-dyed HBT fabric, a fancy blend of 60% linen and 40% cotton. The second, a dark and handsome 2×1 selvedge denim with a “snowy” neppy texture, an old mfsc favorite previously featured on our 2015 Tonkinoise. One of the photo above features a worn Tonkinoise rubbing elbows with a raw DOCKYARD, and showing some denim evolution. With proper wear and care, one can anticipate an attractive indigo patina with both versions.

For the front closure of the indigo HBT model, we opted for genuine bone buttons, all with subtle color and surface variations. The denim version features black painted 1940s-style donut wreath buttons. The denim fabric selvedge is displayed on the button placket facing and cuff facing.

Stay tuned for the soon-to-be-released remaining pieces of the “Waterfront Surplus” set!

The DOCKYARD Jacket is designed in California by Mister Freedom® and manufactured in Japan in collaboration with Sugar Cane Co.

SPECS:
FABRIC:
Model A: 7.7 Oz. dark indigo-dyed Herringbone Twill (HBT) fabric, blend of 60% linen and 40% cotton. Milled in Japan.
Model B: 10 Oz. dark indigo blue 2×1 denim, “snowy” neppy texture, white with yellow line selvedge ID. Milled in Japan.

DETAILS:
* An original mfsc pattern inspired by a rare 1930s French Navy/civilian shipyard utility jacket.
* Shawl collar with removable chinstrap.
* Two hip patch pockets.
* Genuine bone buttons (HBT model), or black donut wreath buttons (denim model)
* Selvedge button placket facing and cuff facing (denim model only)
* Adjustable cuffs.
* Two concealed chest pockets, stripe ticking fabric.
* Back panel cinching darts.
* Chainstitch construction, no open seams.
* Mister Freedom® mfsc woven rayon “SURPLUS” label.
* Made in Japan.

SIZING/FIT:
The following applies to both fabric options. The MF® DOCKYARD Jacket comes raw/unwashed and is cut so that the measurements match the labeling after an initial cold soak/line dry. 
We recommend this usual protocol before wearing:

  • Cold soak for about 30-40mn, with occasional hand agitation.
  • Spin dry and line dry.
  • Hang until fully dry.

Due to the 100% cotton stitching, some attractive puckering will show at the seams after the soak, giving the jacket more of a vintage feel. The denim version will be stiffer after the initial soak due to the re-activated starch but the stiffness is temporary and will subside rapidly with wear.
I opted for a comfortable 38 (MEDIUM) in both fabric options, both with a similar fit but different drape.

Please refer to sizing chart for approximate raw/soaked measurements.
Soaked = 30-40mn cold soak, spin dry and line dry (ie. minimal shrinkage).

CHART

Available RAW/unwashed.
CARE:
Launder when needed. For both options, we recommend turning the DOCKYARD Jacket inside out to avoid marbling of the fabric.
Machine wash on gentle cycle, cold water, minimum eco-friendly mild detergent and line dry.
Patina will develop according to activities and frequency of wear.

Available Raw/unwashed ONLY.
Sizes
34 X-small (indigo HBT only)
36 Small
38 Medium
40 Large
42 X-Large
44 XX-Large

Available from www.misterfreedom.com, our Los Angeles red brick HQ, and fine retailers around the World.
Email sales@misterfreedom.com or call 323-653-2014 with any questions unanswered above.
Thank you for your support,

Christophe Loiron
Mister Freedom®
©2020

Mister Freedom® Pantalon “Le VAILLANT”, FW2019 mfsc “Pioupiou” Collection, Indigo-dyed Linen-Cotton and SC401 “Hawaii” selvedge denim. Made in Japan.

Á la soupe! (1914)
Photo by Jacques Moreau from the book “1914-1918 Nous étions des hommes” Courtesy Edition de la Martinière ©2004

Mister Freedom® FW2019 mfsc Pantalon “Le VAILLANT”: Indigo-dyed Linen-Cotton model.

Pantalon “Le Vaillant” (2019) and worn “Le Valseur” (2017), cut from the same indigo-dyed HBT Linen/Cotton.

Mister Freedom® FW2019 mfsc Pantalon “Le VAILLANT”: SC401 “Hawaii” selvedge denim model.

Mister Freedom® x Sugar Cane Co Pantalon “Le VAILLANT”.
FW2019 mfsc “PIOUPIOU” Collection.
Made in Japan.

We introduced the historical background of our FW2019 mfsc “PIOUPIOU” collection with the recent release of the Mécano Jacket. The “VAILLANT” is the matching bottom that completes this jacket/trousers ‘fictitious’ set.

As mentioned in that intro, the flamboyant red trousers (the infamous Modèle 1867 Pantalon Garance) flashed by the pioupious at the onset of WW1 proved fateful for many. Well-adapted for gun smoke-filled battlefield of the 1830’s (the trousers original design dated back to 1829), when the vibrant red color helped French soldiers spot comrades amidst thick black gunpowder clouds, these fancy trousers proved totally unsuitable for the modern international warfare of 1914.
As soon as October 1914, the French Minister of the Armies ordered thousands of indigo-blue light-weight canvas work trousers (of civilian origin and designs, as worn by mechanics and blue-collar workers) to be requisitioned, dispatched to soldiers, and urgently worn over the Pantalon Garance. This triggered last minute production of tens of thousands of indigo blue overalls…

As an anecdote, I remember scoring a very large amount of similar work trousers in a Paris flea market (Puces de Montreuil), sometime in the early 2000’s, when the Parisian Puces promised more than Bob Marley T-shirts and used fast fashion junk. It must have been around 06:00AM when I spotted a dealer unloading bundles after bundles of blue pants from his truck… Surviving the initial heart attack, I suggested he’d leave them inside, and painstakingly cut a deal. And hour later, I was loading my rental car with about 150 pairs of NOS 1920’s-40’s indigo buckle-back vintage work pants! Some specimen from that lucky haul have survived after all those years, and are now part of the Mister Freedom® HQ archives. These are completely generic and very similar to the hastily-produced indigo overalls issued to French Poilus in 1915, and probably share the same manufacturing factories.

NOS 1920’s-40’s French utility pants loot, surviving specimen of a Parisian flea market lucky find in the early 2000s.

Before fashion designer Paul Poiret got commissioned to draft new outfits for French infantry troops (source here), leading to the familiar Bleu Horizon woolen uniforms issued at the end of 1915, civilian garments were often adopted by weary Poilus, as seen on period documents. Indigo blue mechanic overalls, drab corduroy (Velour d’Amiens) or coutil hunting jodhpurs, civvy leather brodequins, non-regulation stripe flannel shirts and jury-rigged sheepskin ponchos, hand-knit wool scarves sent to the front by anguished mothers and wives… All this, added to raw material restrictions and to the chaos of war, definitely made for an eclectically-clad bunch on the battlefields.
Check out the photographic works of Jacques Moreau in the book “1914-1918 Nous Étions Des Hommes” for vivid, rarely-seen hi-res visuals of Poilus in the field and in their daily life, chronologically documented. Fascinating.

Design-wise, the pattern of our Pantalon “Le VAILLANT” (French spelling for the word valiant) is inspired by late 1800’s utility and uniform trousers, the afore mentioned M1867 Pantalon Garance, and the classic white HBT linen M1882 bourgeron chore fatigues. Again, our rendition is a wearable hybrid and not a replica.
If we kept the traditional expansion gusset/cinch strap, we added two rear welt pockets, as pants without rear pockets are a bit hard to pull-off in 2019. Then came the pocketing/lining challenge… a tailoring puzzle skillfully solved by Mr. Fukutomi, Toyo Enterprise’s talented pattern-maker! We are partial to no open seams/no overlock in general, so the inside of our garments often become an elaborate textile origami of folded fabrics and seams.
We played with fabrics and pocketing patterns to let both indigo and white stripe tickings compliment each others, a concealed visual treat for the vintage clothing aficionado and tailoring connoisseur. The MF® Advertising Dept suggested “With the Pantalon Le VAILLANT, impress with what’s inside the trousers!“, but it probably won’t fly.
Anyways, the pocket openings are decorated with arcuate stitching, typical of turn-of-the-Century Old World tailoring. We also added thin belt loops for practicality, since suspenders are not everyone’s cup of tea. The extended button waist tab is a period detail. The button fly facing is cut from indigo-dyed poplin, for another serving of visual stimulation and a guarantee of interesting patina down the line.

Just as its Mécano amigo, our “Le VAILLANT” comes in two distinct fabric options. The first is a deep indigo-dyed linen/cotton herringbone twill (HBT), an old mfsc favorite with very rewarding patina potential. This linen-cotton blend fabric we developed a few years ago was inspired by late 1880’s French Firemen uniforms. It has been previously featured on the ValseurVeste Belleville and Gilet Gadjo  of the 2017 mfsc Gypsy Blues collection.
We also thought an “Americanized” version would be an interesting hybrid, so we are offering the “Le VAILLANT” in a sturdy 14 Oz. “401 Hawaii” selvedge dark indigo-dyed denim twill. This blend of 50% cotton and 50% recycled sugarcane fibers is milled in Japan exclusively for Sugar Cane Co. The “401” will be familiar to MF® OGs, as it was featured on the right leg of the original mfsc UFO, aka “7161” Utility Trousers released in 2006. This is the first time in 13 years that we are using this beautiful fabric again, with its characteristic subtle indigo shade variations in the yarns, its interesting denim nep, and attractive slub.

The 401 denim “Le VAILLANT” option is complimented by early workwear-style metal tack buttons with dull aluminum finish, while the HBT model features genuine bone suspender buttons.

Finally, our original FW2019 “Pioupiou” woven label design features a hardy and mighty Zouave (zouzou in military jargon of the period), and is a reference to La Coloniale and its often eluded 590,000 man-strong participation in the Allied victory of WW1. The specific grayish blue color of the label is a reference to the classic 1915 “Bleu Horizon” afore mentioned.

The MF® Pantalon “Le VAILLANT” is designed in California by Mister Freedom® and manufactured in Japan by Sugar Cane Co.

SPECS:
PATTERN:
An original mfsc pattern inspired by vintage French military late 1800’s utility and uniform trousers, such as the Modèle 1867 Pantalon Garance, and the classic natural HBT linen M1882 bourgeron.

FABRICS:
Two distinct options:
a) Dark indigo-dyed 15 Oz. blend of 80% linen and 20% cotton herringbone twill (HBT), selvedge, milled in Japan.
b) Sturdy 14 Oz. “401 Hawaii” dark indigo-dyed denim twill, a blend of 50% cotton and 50% recycled sugarcane fibers. White w/ green line selvedge ID. Milled in Japan exclusively for Sugar Cane Co.

DETAILS:

  • Vintage-inspired silhouette with slightly tapered leg and medium-high rise.
  • Traditional rear cinch strap and selvedge expansion gusset with split waist band.
  • Two rear welt pockets, coin pocket and slash side pockets.
  • Decorative arcuate stitch on pocket openings.
  • Spilt outseams displaying fabric selvedge.
  • Thin trousers-style belt loops for wider belts.
  • Suspender buttons:
    a) Genuine bone with attractive finish for the indigo HBT Le VAILLANT.
    b) 1930’s style metal tack buttons with dull aluminum finish for the denim Le VAILLANT.
  • Fly buttons:
    a) Amber brown corrozo for the indigo HBT Le VAILLANT.
    b) Utilitarian donut type with dull aluminum finish for the denim Le VAILLANT.
  • Pocketing: attractive combination of cotton indigo stripe ticking, white stripe ticking and indigo-dyed cotton poplin.
  • Original mfsc “Pioupiou” woven rayon label.
  • Made in Japan.

SIZING/FIT:
Both versions of the “Le VAILLANT” come raw/un-rinsed. We recommend the usual protocol before wearing:

  • Cold soak for about 30-40mn, with occasional hand agitation.
  • Spin dry and line dry.
  • Wear briefly before fully-dry to set creases, then hang until fully dry.

Both versions will fit approximately the same following the above procedure, although the denim “Le VAILLANT” feels roomier because our mfsc shrink tests are done with heat-dried garments. There is therefore more shrinkage to be expected for the denim version with subsequent washing, or if a heat dryer is used.
We don’t recommend heat drying as this tends to soften garments, ‘break’ the fabric starch, and result in unsightly fold creases or marbling marks. Garment stiffness after a soak/line dry will subside rapidly with normal wear.

Fit: Due to the split waistband/rear expansion gusset pattern, the “Le VAILLANT” have a generous waist. Fully cinching the back strap will take in the waist by about 1 ½ inch. If your waist measures an actual 32 inches, the “Le VAILLANT” W32 will have a generous seat leg and a very comfortable fit. For a slimmer silhouette, if your waistline allows it, sizing down is an option. I usual wear W32 in mfsc trousers, but opted to size-down to a W30 for these, for a tighter seat and tapered leg silhouette.
Hemming: The bottom hem on both models is done using a single needle machine, no special chainstitch machine required. Not a fan of contemporary stacking, I opted to crop “Le VAILLLANT” quite high, above the traditional trousers’ break.
Regardless of the length of your liking, these trousers might look better traditionally hemmed than with Wild Ones denim rolls, unless you go with the full leg silhouette.

Please refer to sizing chart for measurements, reflecting a 30-40mn cold soak/spin dry/line dry process, resulting in minimal shrinkage. The raw measurements are given for reference only, as the numbers that actually matter are post soak. We do believe that, according to frequency of use, washable garments should be laundered when needed, and not kept ‘raw’.

“Le Vaillant” 401 Denim

CARE:
Launder when needed.
We recommend turning indigo blue/denim garments inside out to avoid marbling during laundering. Machine wash, cold water, gentle cycle, eco-friendly mild detergent and line dry.
Potential attractive patina will develop according to activities and frequency of wear.
Please note that dark indigo might cause color transfer, and potentially “bleed” on light-colored garments, furniture, and skin.

Available raw/unwashed.
Sizes
W28
W30
W32
W34
W36
W38

Available from www.misterfreedom.com, our Los Angeles brick & mortar store, and fine retailers around the World.
Email sales@misterfreedom.com or call 323-653-2014 with any questions unanswered above.

Thank you for your support,
Christophe Loiron
Mister Freedom® 2019

Mister Freedom® “Le Valseur”, Stripe covert and Indigo cotton-linen HBT, GYPSY BLUES mfsc Spring 2017

 

 

 

Mister Freedom® “Le Valseur”, Stripe Covert and Indigo cotton-linen HBT.
GYPSY BLUES mfsc collection Spring 2017.
Made in Japan.

Dancing partner of the Veste Belleville and its Gilet Gadjo sidekick, the MF® Valseur is the latest addition to our Gypsy Blues Spring 2017 collection.
This new pattern is inspired by French 1920’s to 1950’s fancy gentlemen’s trousers, mixing elements of several vintage specimen from our archives into the usual Mister Freedom® shaker. The higher rise and full straight leg of the Valseur are a nostalgic nod to ballroom dancing, guinguettes and Saint-Germain-des-Prés jazz caves, but should also work for the rave shuffle.
The defunct colloquialism valseur is a French argot term that only old-timers will get. The literal translation is “waltz dancer”, but in 1900’s slang, valseur came to designate a pair of trousers. It was also used by wise guys and Parisian Apaches to refer to one’s buttocks…
More relevantly, our trousers come in two distinct fabric options.
Both were introduced with the release of our Veste Belleville and the Gilet Gadjo: an indigo-dyed cotton/linen HBT (the same sturdy fabric of our Waterfront Coat, indigo-dyed to a dark and rich hue), a textile inspired by early French firemen uniform of the 1900’s, and a 100% cotton stripe covert fabric, a sort of heather charcoal grey salt & pepper with a subtle woven stripe pattern, developed from a vintage swatch of 1930’s French workwear NOS textile. Both fabrics were milled in Japan.

 The Valseur is designed in California by MISTER FREEDOM® and manufactured in Japan by SUGAR CANE Co.

SPECS:

FABRICS:
Option A) indigo HBT
A sturdy 15 Oz. blend of 80% linen and 20% cotton indigo-dyed HBT textile, selvedge, milled in Japan.
Please note that some light streaking can be observed on leg panels at times. This is due to the nature of indigo-dyeing this specific heavy textured fabric. This is not considered as a defect, and will subside with wear. This indigo-dyed fabric is very light sensitive and its hue will evolve rapidly.
Option B) Stripe Covert
A lighter 9 Oz. covert woven stripe 100% cotton fabric, black selvedge ID, milled in Japan.

DETAILS:
* Inspired by classic 1920’s to 1950’s French gentlemen’s trousers and fine tailor-made garments.
* Higher rise, fit top block and full straight leg silhouette.
* Button fly with utilitarian unmarked ‘donut’ metal buttons (copper for the indigo, brass for the covert).
* French-style waist metal hook.
* Selvedge outseam.
* Contrast indigo Wabash twill pocket bags and waistband lining.
* Taped seat seam, fancy indigo-dyed tape.
* Metal “Art Deco” style suspender buttons.
* Two rear welt pockets, with arcuate decorative stitching.
* Cinch back, strap lined with NOS mfsc “Reno” calico twill and featuring a vintage-style copper/steel metal prong buckle.
* Shorter belt loops, for elegant < 1 inch-wide leather belts.
* Tailor-made style crotch lining, cotton sateen.
* 100% cotton stitching (navy blue for Stripe Covert, tonal for Indigo HBT).
* Original “Gypsy Blues” mfsc woven rayon label.
* Made in Japan.

SIZING/FIT:
Both fabric options come raw/unwashed. We recommend the usual method, initial cold soak, spin dry and line dry.
To get the leg silhouette I desired, opted for a Waist 30 in the Stripe Covert. A bit tight in the waist at first since I am more of a measured W31, but the fabric gives slightly with wear and light rug-cutting.
I opted for a Waist 30 in the indigo HBT version as well. A bit more forgiving in the waist (the fabric tends to stretch out slightly with wear), the silhouette is similar but the drape quite different due to the bulkiness of the HBT weave.

 

Please refer to chart to figure which size works for you. If still confused, email sales@misterfreedom.com

Valseur COVERT

Valseur HBT

CARE:
Indigo HBT: When needed, hand wash or machine wash on delicate, cold water, minimal eco-friendly detergent. Turn inside-out to avoid marbling of the fabric. Line dry ONLY.
DO NOT use heat dryer as this will leave marbling lines and set un-natural creases to the indigo HBT linen fabric.

Covert stripe: Machine wash on delicate, cold water, minimal eco-friendly detergent. Line dry.

Available raw/unwashed.
Sizes
W28
x L34
W30
x L34
W32
x L34
W34
x L34
W36
x L34
W38
x L34

Indigo HBT: $ 499.95
Covert Stripe: $ 449.95

Available from www.misterfreedom.com, our Los Angeles brick & mortar store, and fine retailers around the World.
Email sales@misterfreedom.com or call 323-653-2014 with any questions unanswered above.
Thank you for your support.

Christophe Loiron
Mister Freedom®
©2017

Mister Freedom GILET GADJO, indigo cotton-linen HBT and Stripe Covert, “GYPSY BLUES” mfsc Spring 2017

Young Gypsy (photo Lucien Clergue, 1959), courtesy Atelier Lucien Clergue ©1959

Cristóbal De La Marina Del Rey, with duende ©1966

Caravans (Vincent Van Gogh, 1888)

Gilet Gadjo, indigo cotton/linen HBT & cotton covert stripe.
“Gypsy Blues” mfsc collection Spring 2017
Made in Japan

The Romani term “gadjo” refers to folks of non-Romani origin. It is today quite a common colloquialism in Southern France, and is used to designate a male individual (as in ‘guy’ or ‘dude’).
Vise-moi un peu le gadjo!” (Check out that dude!).
Chances are you could hear that one a few times, should you find yourself around the Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer on May 24th, walking around town sporting Mister Freedom®’s latest.

The pattern of the MF® GYPSY BLUES Gilet Gadjo is inspired by 1910’s-1930’s French Gentlemen’ waistcoats. The shawl lapel, fine sateen back, cinch back strap and fancy lining make for an elegant addition to the discerning gadjo‘s closet. We took the dandy vibe a notch down by donning our gilet a set of donut-shape metal buttons as front closure, hardware parts usually reserved for vintage workwear-type garments.

The two fabric options were introduced with the release of our Veste Belleville. An indigo-dyed cotton/linen HBT (the same sturdy fabric of our Waterfront Coat, indigo-dyed to a dark and rich hue), a textile inspired by early French firemen uniform of the 1900’s, and a 100% cotton stripe covert fabric, a sort of heather charcoal grey salt & pepper with a subtle woven stripe pattern, developed from a vintage swatch of 1930’s French workwear NOS textile. Both fabrics were milled in Japan.

Familiar to the EU vintage clothing aficionado, French waistcoats from the 1920’s-30’s typically feature a stern shell (often black wool serge) and an unusual inner lining (fancy printed fabric probably left-over from a custom shirting project). It is not uncommon to come across such tailor-made vintage specimen with a formal appearance and a flamboyant inner lining.

Digging through the archives, we found limited NOS yardages of forgotten textile goodness from past mfsc collections, and decided to use that as linings on this project. Both indigo discharge calicoes are from our MEN of THE FRONTIER days, namely the Apache and Pueblo Trade Shirt.
But, for heaven’ snakes, what do American cowboys have to do with French gypsies you axe me?..
The relevance would be Old-West-obsessed Folco de Baroncelli and the Gardians of Camargue, aka ze French cowboyz. The famed horsemen of the delta of the Rhone, Southern France, typically wear shirts with traditional calico-type motifs from Provence. Camargue’s most iconic commune is Saintes-Marie-de-la-Mer, pilgrimage destination for Gypsies from the four corners of Europe.
Voila the common thread.

 The Gilet Gadjo is designed in California by MISTER FREEDOM® and manufactured in Japan by SUGAR CANE Co.

Credits: Lucien Clergue‘s 1959 photograph courtesy of Lucien Clergue Atelier.

SPECS:
FABRICS:
Option A
* Front panels: A sturdy 15 Oz. blend of 80% linen and 20% cotton indigo-dyed HBT textile, selvedge, milled in Japan.
Please note that some light streaking can be observed on some garment panels at times. This is due to the nature of indigo-dyeing this specific heavy textured fabric. This is not considered as a defect, and will subside with wear. This indigo-dyed fabric is very light sensitive and its hue will evolve rapidly.
* Back panel: 100% cotton sateen back, lined with indigo discharge print poplin, mfsc “Pueblo” calico. Solid indigo-dyed fine cotton poplin front panel lining.
Option B
* Front panels: A lighter 9 Oz. covert woven stripe 100% cotton fabric, milled in Japan.
* Back panel: 100% cotton sateen back, lined with indigo discharge print poplin, mfsc “Apache” calico. Solid indigo-dyed fine cotton poplin front panel lining.

DETAILS:
* Original mfsc pattern inspired by 1910’s-30’s European tailor-made fancy waistcoats.
* Elegant and traditional silhouette, to match higher-waisted trousers or blue jeans.
* Shawl lapel.
* Chest darts and early waistcoat gussets and paneling.
* Fancy indigo discharge-print calico poplin lining.
* Sateen back, oxidized black color.
* Cinch back strap, with vintage-style metal prong buckle.
* Three welt pockets.
* Utilitarian unmarked ‘donut’ metal buttons (copper for the indigo, brass for the covert)
* Made in Japan.

SIZING/FIT:
Both fabric options come raw/unwashed.
We recommend the usual method, initial cold soak, spin dry and line dry.
I opted to size down on both the indigo HBT and the grey covert. I usually wear 38 (Medium) in mfsc jackets, but went with a 36 (small) with the Gilet Gadjo, for an old school fit and high-waisted silhouette. The fit photos shows both sizes/fits, 36 and 38.

Please refer to chart to figure which size works for you. If still confused, email sales@misterfreedom.com

 

CARE:
Indigo HBT: When needed, hand wash or machine wash on delicate, cold water, minimal eco-friendly detergent. Turn inside-out to avoid marbling of the fabric. Line dry ONLY.
DO NOT use heat dryer as this will leave marbling lines and set un-natural creases to the indigo HBT linen fabric.

Covert stripe: Machine wash on delicate, cold water, minimal eco-friendly detergent. Line dry.

DISCLAIMER: Use caution when laundering, as the metal buckle of the cinch strap has sharp prongs that could get snagged and damage this (or other) garment(s).

Available raw/unwashed.
Sizes
36 Small
38 Medium
40 Large
42 X-Large
44 XX-Large
Retail:
Indigo HBT: $399.95
Covert Stripe: $379.95

Available from www.misterfreedom.com, our Los Angeles brick & mortar store, and fine retailers around the World.
Email sales@misterfreedom.com or call 323-653-2014 with any questions unanswered above.
Thank you for your support.

Christophe Loiron
Mister Freedom®
©2017